Posts tagged ‘vSphere’

vSphere Fault Tolerance Role Privilege names have changed from vSphere 5.5 to 6.0

I was playing in my lab today and ran across something I thought was strange. I exported the privileges from a test role in one lab, which happened to be vSphere 5.5, then tried to create a new role in vCenter 6.0 with the privileges I just pulled. It worked fine for almost everything, except these two:

Could not find Privilege with name 'Enable Fault Tolerance'.
Could not find Privilege with name 'Disable Fault Tolerance'.

I thought that was kind of strange, so I ran a quick

Get-VIPrivilege | ? {$_.name -like "*fault*"} | select Name,Id

and looked for something similar. Below is the comparison of 5.5 & 6.0:

vSphere 5.5
Name - Id
------
Turn On Fault Tolerance - VirtualMachine.Interact.CreateSecondary
Turn Off Fault Tolerance - VirtualMachine.Interact.TurnOffFaultTolerance
Disable Fault Tolerance - VirtualMachine.Interact.DisableSecondary
Enable Fault Tolerance - VirtualMachine.Interact.EnableSecondary
Query Fault Tolerance compatibility - VirtualMachine.Config.QueryFTCompatibility

vSphere 6.0
Name - Id
------
Turn On Fault Tolerance - VirtualMachine.Interact.CreateSecondary
Turn Off Fault Tolerance - VirtualMachine.Interact.TurnOffFaultTolerance
Suspend Fault Tolerance - VirtualMachine.Interact.DisableSecondary
Resume Fault Tolerance - VirtualMachine.Interact.EnableSecondary
Query Fault Tolerance compatibility - VirtualMachine.Config.QueryFTCompatibility

The difference is not drastic, but one simply word, or even one character, out of place will cause your script to fail. It’s easy to see that “Turn On” and “Enable” sound the same, so the need to rename “Enable” to “Resume” makes sense to me. Same with Disable & Suspend. These are just the two I know about, I really should write another article listing which ones have changed, but that’s for another day :)

Just something to watch out for I wanted to share.

Happy scripting!

vMotion fails at 10% with error 0xbad010d on VMware ESXi

Written February 14th, 2013 by
Categories: Virtualization
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I recently had this problem, but forgot to take a screenshot for the blog, sorry guys.

I was patching an HA/DRS cluster using VUM and none of the VMs would migrate off one specific host. The error it gave was “A general system error occured: Failed to start migration pre-copy Error 0xbad010d. The Esx host failed connect over the VMotion network”.

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Automated deployment script builds VM, registers in SCCM

This is a follow-up to my last post about fully automated deployment

Below is the script. After it pulls the information from you, it creates the VM, adds the second disk, sleeps for 15 seconds, pulls the MAC from the new VM, creates the computer object in SCCM, adds it to the collection, sleeps for 15 seconds, refreshes the collection, sleeps for 15 seconds, then powers on the VM. If you’ve got a mandatory OSD advertised to the collection specified, and the OSD is fully automated, it will lay down the OS and the computername will be the name you provided to the script.
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PowerCLI + VMware + SCCM = sweetness, aka automated deployment

Written May 26th, 2011 by
Categories: Scripts
3 comments

So I’m creating a script that builds a VM for you, imports the NetBIOS name & MAC address into SCCM, adds it to a specific collection, and then powers on the VM. If you have a mandatory OS Deployment for that collection, you don’t have to do anything but sit back and watch (given your Task Sequence is fully automated).

It prompts you for vCenter name, VM name, cpu, ram, description, disk size, queries vcenter for clusters, networks, datastores (sorted by free space), and verifies with you before building…

I’m excited & pleased that it’s actually working. It’s currently proprietary to my work environment, but I will try to strip all that out and let you change what needs to be changed to use it where you like.

Happy Scripting!!!

Script to pull host UUID for VMware PowerCLI

Written February 2nd, 2011 by
Categories: Scripts
12 comments

A reader on a previous post asked about pulling host UUIDs, so I wipped together this script.

Usage is like this:
Get-VMHostUUID.ps1 -vmhosts ("host1","host2","host3")or
Get-VMHostUUID.ps1 -vc vcenterserver -container cluster1/folder/dc/etc
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DRS Host affinity in 3x & 4.0 – keeping a VM from migrating to a different host

Written January 31st, 2011 by
Categories: Virtualization
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Using DRS in vSphere is a great thing for load balancing your cluster, but what if you need to keep one VM from vMotioning to another host?  Everyone mention’s host affinity when searching, but digging through the DRS settings doesn’t really show much.

The closest thing to ‘Host Affinity’ is this KB article from VMware.

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System Error: vmodl.fault.hostcommunication

I upgraded one of my lab hosts to ESXi 4.1 yesterday and was plagued with this error:

System Error: vmodl.fault.hostcommunication

vmodl.fault.hostcommunication

A lot of people are getting this error without a lot of direction. As it turns out, this is because I upgraded one of my hosts to 4.1 without upgrading vCenter to 4.1. Silly me! Who would have thought that vSphere vCenter couldn’t manage a vSphere host because it’s rev is 0.1 higher?

VMware vSphere 4.1 Configuration Maximums

Written July 31st, 2010 by
Categories: Virtualization
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ESXi 4.0 Update 1 brought with it one major update (as I pointed out here). Now that 4.1 was released on July 13th, I wanted to take a look and see if anything else major has been changed.

Biggest change was they lifted the 160 VMs per host in an 8-node HA cluster.  Now it’s the maximum of 320 VMs per host, and a maximum of 32 nodes per HA cluster.  Problem is, they imposed a maximum of 3000 VMs per cluster (standard, HA, or DRS, they no longer differentiate them), so you’d just have to find your sweet spot to maximize how you want your cluster set up.  Not that 3000 VMs per cluster is a problem, but if you ran 320 VMs on 75% of a 32-node cluster (leaving 25% for failover), that’s 7680.  That’s a difference of 4680 VMs.  At any rate, I’m glad they lifted the 40 VMs per host in a 9+ configuration.

The Configuration Maximums for 4.1 can be found here.

Here are some of the key features that have changed:

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VMware ESXi 4.1 brings Scripted Installs!!

Written July 31st, 2010 by
Categories: Virtualization
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This is a welcomed (and much demanded) added feature to ESXi. I talked about the deployment of multiple ESXi hosts previously and how I used a golden image to lay down on individual SD cards.

It’s currently supported using a boot CD or PXE. However, the scripted installation is only for local or remote disks, installation on USB devices (SD cards, etc), isn’t currently supported.

It’s very similar to ESX, in that it uses a kickstart file to load the OS, and can be pulled from all the typical locations (FTP, HTTP, NFS, USB, etc).

At least this is a huge step in the right direction.

For more information on the install of ESXi 4.1, see chapter 5 of this doc.

VMware’s Advanced Options for HA Cluster – das.slotCpuInMhz das.slotMemInMB das.SlotNumVCpus

Since deploying the Nexus 1000v, it set our slot sizes in the cluster to 1.5GHz and 2GB of RAM. Not wanting to waste slots in our cluster by guests that may not reach that size (or partially fill slots), I wanted to carve out the cluster into slots of a lesser size, similar to using smaller block sizes on a drive to maximize space.

Using percentage reservations with vSphere, you can get by the slot sizes, but what if you’re starting a small cluster and growing it as resources are needed? How could I carve 25% out of a 2-node cluster? Sure, you can do it, but if you’re operating at the full 75% (with 25% reserved for failover) and lose a host, you actually don’t have enough resources and are over-committed by 25%.

Setting the following settings will help reduce your slot size, but may also have a negative impact by not having enough reservations if you end up in a failover state.
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